3 Luxurious Homemade Goat Milk Soap Recipes

3 Luxurious Homemade Goat Milk Soap Recipes

Goats milk soap with some mint and rosemary on top

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Table Of Contents

The thought of a warm bath full of rich and creamy goat’s milk sounds wonderful! Thankfully when it’s used as an ingredient in my goat milk soap recipe it still retains that rich creamy texture you would hope to expect.

I have three wonderful goat milk soaps to share with you, a rosemary and mint soap, a creamy goat’s milk soap, and a chocolate milk soap.

homemade goat milk soap with some mint and rosemary on top

Why Goats Milk Soap?

Whenever I use fresh milk in my cold process soapmaking I always choose goats milk, it’s a lot easier to use than cow’s milk and I’ve always had great success with it. However, if this is the first time you’re using fresh milk in soap there are a few things you may wish to consider.

  • First of all, fresh goat’s milk will change the color of the soap to a deep honey color, so it’s not very suitable for use with any pigments. It also tends to have a strong smell; thankfully this doesn’t stay with the finished soap!
  • Fresh goat’s milk has a tendency to curdle your soap. I avoid this by freezing the milk before adding it to the water and before adding the lye. If the soap still curdles and you are using a stick blender you should be able to continue blending until the mixture becomes smooth.
  • The goat’s milk within this recipe can help with dry and itchy skin so it is a great choice if you suffer from Eczema or Psoriasis. However, if you already have healthy skin, goat’s milk soap can help to maintain this. 
  • Using this soap regularly will leave your skin feeling moisturized as goat milk creates a skin protection barrier. It is less drying than a normal soap made with water as well as helping to remove dead skin cells leaving your skin feeling refreshed. 
  • Goats milk is high in vitamins and antioxidants too meaning that the soap should be soothing and nourishing for your skin. 

For the rosemary and mint goats milk soap recipe, I used rosemary essential oil to compliment the goat’s milk with its soothing properties which again help with dry skin. It also brings a lovely woodsy scent to the soap. 

I used mint essential oil too as it helps to tone the skin as well as hydrate and rejuvenate. It has a cool and refreshing aroma that blends wonderfully with the rosemary.

Watch How To Make Goats Milk Soap

Goats milk soap with some mint and rosemary on top

Rosemary & Mint Goat Milk Soap Recipe

Whenever I use fresh milk in my soapmaking I always choose goats milk, it's a lot easier to use than cow's milk and I've always had great success with it.
5 from 3 votes
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Prep Time: 1 day
Active Time: 1 day
Total Time: 2 days
Difficulty Level: Intermediate
Yield: 12 Bars (approx)
Author: Angela Wills
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Ingredients

Instructions

  • Freeze the goat milk overnight.
    Goats milk frozen in an ice cube tray
  • If you’ve not made soap before, take a look at my full cold process tutorial here.
    Put on your protective clothing, gloves, mask, and glasses. I always find it best to then prepare and weigh all of the ingredients before starting.
    soapmaking PPE
  • Pop the goats milk ice cubes into a jug then carefully add the lye. Once the lye has dissolved, set it aside to cool in a safe place.
    Lye crystals poured into a jug containing frozen goats milk
  • Put the coconut oil, olive oil, sunflower oil, castor oil and cocoa butter into a large glass jug then melt in the microwave using a 30 second blast.  Then set aside to cool. 
    liquid and soild oils are combined so they can be melted
  • Now we need to balance the oils and the lye. They should be between 120f and 90f (49c 60c)
    The temperature of the melted oils is taken in a process known as 'balancing'.
  • Once balanced, pour the lye into the oils. Do this slowly to avoid splashing
    Lye is poured into the oils
  • Using a blender, stir your mixture for several minutes before switching it on.
    Turn the blender on and give your mixture a few short 3 second blitz, stirring between each burst.
    Continue until the batter thickens and leaves a thin trace on the surface of the batter before disappearing back into the mixture.
    Soap batter is blended with a stick blender
  • Now you can add the rosemary and mint essential oils. Then give it another few blasts with the blender until it thickens but remains liquid.
    Essential oil is poured into the soap batter that has reached trace
  • Next, transfer the soap to the mold. If the mixture is too thick to pour, then you might need to spoon it in instead.
    Goat milk soap batter is poured into a silicon soap mold
  • Pop the mold into the fridge for 24hrs to harden. Take it out of the fridge and leave for a further 24hrs before popping it out of the mold.
    Remember it will still be a bit caustic until cured so put on your gloves before releasing it. It will then need to be cut.
    A bar of goat milk soap that has been removed from the mold
  • The goat milk soap will need to cure for around 4 weeks before it is ready for use. Let the soaps sit and air in a cool dry place, remembering to rotate them weekly.
    The goat milk soap is cut into bars
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Creamy Goats Milk Soap Recipe

This is a creamy medium to soft homemade milk soap with lots of bubble lather and the beautiful aroma of ylang ylang essential oil. This goat milk soap recipe leaves your skin feeling so soft and smooth, it’s a must make for all soap makers.

diy goats milk soap

Ingredients

Makes around 12 bars (I’ve used a cutlery bin to make a nice half moon soap shape, you can find an example of this bin here Soap Making Supplies).

Method

Follow the steps below using the cold process method.

  1. A few hours or the day before making the soap, weigh the goat’s milk and pour it into ice cube trays for freezing.
  2. Gather your soap making equipment and ingredients, and put on your protective gear, rubber gloves, face mask, and goggles. Place the frozen milk into a pyrex jug, then put the jug into a safe place such as a sink and add the lye/caustic soda and stir until the lye has fully dissolved. Set aside and leave to cool to around 140f (60c) to 120f (49c).
  3. Meanwhile; gently melt the shortening, beeswax, and olive oil in a stainless steel pan on the stove or in a heatproof glass jug in the microwave using 30-second bursts. Once melted add the sunflower oil. Adding the sunflower oil at room temperature rather than warming it will help the oils to cool to quicker. You are aiming for the oils to cool to around 140f (60c) to 120f (49) to match the lye solution.
  4. When both the lye and oils are between 140f (60c) to 120f (49) they are ready to combine. When adding the lye to the oils I always prefer to start mixing them manually with a spatula before moving on to an electric hand blender. This is just a personal preference and I only give it a few stirs before switching. The important thing here is to add the lye to the oils rather than adding the oils to the lye.
  5. Before putting the stick blender into the soap batter give it a quick blitz just to make sure there are no hidden air bubbles trapped in the blender. Blend the batter using 30-second bursts, stirring and checking for trace between each burst. Trace is when you can trickle a little of the soap back into the batter and it leaves behind a trace before disappearing back into the batter.
  6. Once the batter has reached trace, go back to using a spatula and stir in the ylang-ylang essential oil.
  7. As soon as the essential oil has been mixed into the soap batter, get it into the mold. The soap can thicken quickly when things are added to it, so you don’t want to hang around here. If the soap does become too thick to pour, use a spoon to transfer it and then give the mold a couple of taps on the counter to level it out a bit. You may also need to smooth the surface of the soap with the spatula or the flat part of the spoon.
  8. Cover the mold with a piece of cardboard and leave to harden for around 24 hours before removing it from the mold.
  9. Once the soap has hardened, remove it from the mold and cut it into bars. The bars will need to cure for four weeks before they will be mild enough to use. To cure them stand the bars upright with around a ¼ inch between them, they will also need to be turned once a week.

Photos From Making This Soap

how to make goat's milk soap

Yummy Homemade Chocolate Soap

This homemade chocolate soap recipe contains fresh goats milk, it’s great fun and has such a wonderful rich brown color. It’s a perfect soap for cubing up and adding to other white based soaps (see vanilla choc chip soap).

On its own this soap does have a mild milky chocolate scent, but personally if I’m going to make a rich looking chocolate soap I want a rich chocolatey smell. Adding a teaspoon or two of chocolate fragrance oil gives this soap just the scent I like.

homemade chocolate soap with goats milk

Ingredients

This recipe produces a hard soap with lots of creamy bubbles and makes about 12 bars

  • 375g (13.2oz) Shortening (vegetable fat)
  • 250g (8.8oz) Tallow (dripping)
  • 375g (13.2oz) Coconut Oil
  • 15g (0.5oz) Plain dark cooking chocolate (semi-sweet)
  • 200g (7oz) Distilled water
  • 100g (3.5oz) Fresh goats milk
  • 150g (5.2oz) Lye (Sodium Hydroxide/Caustic Soda)
  • 30g (1oz) Chocolate fragrance oil (optional)

Method

Follow the steps below using the cold process method.

A quick word of warning; when cutting into the soap you may find the inside of the soap much lighter than its outer shell, this will darken within a couple of days so don’t panic. You may also notice a strong goats milk odor in the soap, once again don’t panic this will fade away.

  1. A few hours or the day before making the soap, weigh the goat’s milk and pour it into ice cube trays for freezing.
  2. Gather your soap making equipment and ingredients, and put on your protective gear, rubber gloves, face mask, and goggles. Weigh the distilled water and place it into a good-sized heavy-duty plastic or Pyrex jug. Add the frozen milk to the water then Place the jug into a safe place such as a sink and add the Lye/ caustic soda and stir until the lye has fully dissolved. Set aside and leave to cool to around 140f (60c) to 120f (49c).
  3. Meanwhile; gently melt the shortening, tallow, coconut oil, and chocolate in a stainless steel pan on the stove or in a heatproof glass jug in the microwave using 30-second bursts. Once melted add the sunflower oil. Adding the sunflower oil at room temperature rather than warming it will help the oils to cool to quicker. You are aiming for the oils to cool to around 140f (60c) to 120f (49) to match the lye solution.
  4. When both the lye and oils are between 140f (60c) to 120f (49) they are ready to combine. When adding the lye to the oils I always prefer to start mixing them manually with a spatula before moving on to an electric hand blender. This is just a personal preference and I only give it a few stirs before switching. The important thing here is to add the lye to the oils rather than adding the oils to the lye.
  5. Before putting the stick blender into the soap batter give it a quick blitz just to make sure there are no hidden air bubbles trapped in the blender. Blend the batter using 30-second bursts, stirring and checking for trace between each burst. Trace is when you can trickle a little of the soap back into the batter and it leaves behind a trace before disappearing back into the batter.
  6. Once the batter has reached trace, go back to using a spatula and stir in the chocolate fragrance oil if using.
  7. As soon as the fragrance oil has been mixed into the soap batter, get it into the mold. The soap can thicken quickly when things are added to it, so you don’t want to hang around here. If the soap does become too thick to pour, use a spoon to transfer it and then give the mold a couple of taps on the counter to level it out a bit. You may also need to smooth the surface of the soap with the spatula or the flat part of the spoon.
  8. Cover the mold with a piece of cardboard, and place a towel over it to keep it warm. This will allow the soap to gel creating a darker rich color. The soap will need to harden for around 24 hours before removing it from the mold.
  9. Once the soap has hardened, remove it from the mold and cut it into bars. The bars will need to cure for four weeks before they will be mild enough to use. To cure them stand the bars upright with around a ¼ inch between them, they will also need to be turned once a week.

Photos From Making Homemade Chocolate Soap

how to make homemade chocolate soap

So there we have it, three great ways to incorporate goat’s milk into your soaps! I love to play around with different ingredients in my soap formulations, and goat’s milk can make a bar of soap so much more luxurious.

Another great ingredient to try is coconut milk! My coconut and lime soap uses coconut milk in a similar way to the goats milk soap recipes, and it feels amazing on your skin. Definitely take a look at it if you’re interested in using different types of milk in your soaps.

Last but not least, don’t forget to follow us on social media. Facebook and Instagram are great ways to stay up to date on everything we’re doing here on Savvhomemade.

Step 3: Pour into your soap mold

Soap Calculator & Formulation Guide

Select your chosen oils, along with the weight or percentage. The soap calculator will then show the total weight of lye and water required. The result can be instantly adjusted by changing your preferred superfatting level or water/lye ratio.

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Angela Wills
Angela Wills
Hi, I’m Angela, I make most of the homemade things here at Savvy Homemade. I'm an experienced soap maker, skincare formulator, author, busy Mom of 3, and recently a Grandma! "Every day I share my experience while crafting something new, it’s fantastic".

6 thoughts on “3 Luxurious Homemade Goat Milk Soap Recipes”

Discussion (6 Comments)

    • Hi Sherry,

      Many apologies, the method was a bit confusing, but I’ve cleared it up for you. The Cream Goats Milk Soap actually doesn’t require any distilled water at all. Go ahead and add your frozen goat’s milk to your pyrex jug, then your lye. No distilled water needed for this one.

      Reply
  1. I thank you for your recipe and have been using the same ingredients and recipe for my 3 lb. loaf of cp soap. I added 1.25 oz of goat milk powder to about 3 oz. of my oils and blended with stick blender to smooth any lumps and added at trace. The soap was used mainly in a slab mold as well in a few oval molds. It is still curing but seems crumbled and especially when cutting slab into bars it didn’t go well!
    I am not sure what went wrong?

    Reply
  2. Hi Angela, First of all let me say that your website is a gold mine of ideas and inspiration, so congratulations!
    Then I was wondering if this recipe can be made with fresh donkey milk too. Here in my area I’ve found a farm that produce organic donkey milk, so I’m willing to give it a try…
    I have noticed that some people also freeze the milk before adding to the lye solution (http://www.lovinsoap.com/2012/10/how-to-make-goats-milk-soap-using-farm-fresh-goats-milk/) in order to preserve the milk properties….what do you think, this could be the case?
    I would also ask what do you mean by “Shortening (vegetable fat)”? Any vegetable fat would do the job? Could I use for example sustainable harvested Palm Oil or organic Coconut Oil? Or is there a specific ingredient I have to use instead?
    Thank you so much!

    Reply
  3. Do you put anything in the cutlery mold to make the soap come out easily? I got one of those molds and I can’t get the soap out without a lot of banging it on the floor?

    Yours looks so smooth.

    Thanks,
    KK

    Reply
    • Hi Karen, welcome to Savvyhomemade!

      A quick grease round with a little solid oil from any of your soap recipes should do the trick. Check out the full cold process for more detailed info and complete steps from start to finish.

      Reply

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