A Cold Process Shampoo Bar Recipe

This cold process shampoo bar must be one of the best shampoo recipes I’ve ever used. It has a delightful aroma that lasts all day long, and it really does revive flat, dull and thinning hair.

Therapeutic homemade shampoo bars

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I’ve made lots of homemade shampoo before, and recently I had great results with my DIY clarifying shampoo and the shampoo bar without lye, but what about a cold process shampoo bar recipe?

The therapeutic shampoo bar below must be one of the best homemade shampoo recipes I’ve ever used. It has a delightful aroma that lasts all day long, and it really does revive flat, dull and thinning hair.

Therapeutic homemade shampoo bars
Therapeutic Shampoo Bars
  • This cold process shampoo bar is a fantastic soap that’s suitable for all the family including anyone who may be suffering from an itchy or flaky scalp.
  • It’s full of essential oils aimed to stimulate the memory and lift tension, along with nourishing the scalp and adding a lovely shine to your hair.
  • It’s also a great bar to take with you when travelling, especially if you intend to fly.
  • You can cut the amount you may need from one of the bars and pop it in with your hand luggage without the worry of carrying liquids.

The Ingredients

The Method

Watch How To Make Basic Cold Process Soap

Before you make this soap, take a few minutes to watch the video below for the basic method. For more detailed information see how to make cold process soap at home.

Use The Cold Process Soap Making Method plus the following recipe specific steps:

  • In Step 1 – Put the chamomile teabags into a bowl Boil the mineral water and pour it over them. Once cooled, strain, and reserve the infusion. Substitute the water for the infusion in the cold process method step 3.
  • In Step 3 – Melt the creamed coconut with the oils and wax this will need to be stirred continuously to avoid the coconut from sticking to the bottom of the pan whilst heating.
  • In Step 4 – Combine oils and lye when both temperatures equally reach 130 F (55 C)

Photos From This Recipe

how to make a cold process shampoo bar

Annemarie’s Shampoo Bar

Hi! Thanks for sharing your homemade shampoo recipe!

My daughter and I just plopped our first batch into our molds. When I added our crazy blend of essential oils, the batter came to a very thick trace quickly. It’s now getting all gooey and gelly! It was a surprise to see it reach gel phase so quickly.

Very excited to watch it develop into fabulous shampoo!

We forgot to check our essential oil supplies before we started. The original blend was a spicy citrus of lime, orange, cinnamon, and patchouli. When we ran out of lime, we added lemongrass and basil. Then when we ran out of wild orange, we added grapefruit. We barely had enough cinnamon and earth and wood (from Eden’s Garden) to finish the blend. We ended up with a crazy citrus explosion that we will never be able to recreate.

We ran out of sweet almond oil, so I had to supplement with 2 ounces of avocado oil. I definitely blended it too long. The trace was already pretty thick when I added the essential oils. Then it really thickened! We plopped the batter in the molds, and they began to gel immediately.

Annemarie

Annmarie making the shampoo bar
Annmarie making the shampoo bar

Check out more homemade shampoo recipes here. Do you have your own recipe? If so, tell us what ingredients did you used in the comments below.

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Angela Wills

Hi, I'm Angela, and I make most of the homemade things here at Savvy Homemade. I’m fearlessly dedicated to creating tried, tested recipes & products that will work for everyone. I'm an experienced soap maker, skincare formulator, author, busy Mom of 3, and recently a Grandma! Welcome to SavvyHomemade, it's my true passion.

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Discussion (51 Comments)

  1. Hi! Thanks for sharing your recipe!
    My daughter and I just plopped our first batch into our molds. When I added our crazy blend of essential oils, the batter came to a very thick trace quickly. It’s now getting all gooey and gelly! It was a surprise to see it reach gel phase so quickly.
    Very excited to watch it develop into fabulous shampoo!

    Reply
        • A year later, and I’m cooking up another batch!

          My family and friends love this recipe. I made a couple tweaks – distilled water instead of mineral, 3 oz avocado oil and 1 oz sweet almond.

          I’m splitting the batch in half and adding rosemary and mint EO to one, and a citrus blend of EOs to the other.

          Thanks again for sharing your recipe!

          Reply
  2. I Angela,

    Thank you so much for this receipe.
    I have 2 questions :
    . Chamomille tea bags are for blond hair only ? Or maybe we can change with sage for brunettes ?
    . How many time we can keep this shampoo safe ?

    Reply
    • Hi Elle
      The Chamomile is not really there for color, more for its therapeutic properties, but you could use sage if you want to experiment.
      Cold process soap keeps for a long time, as a general rule I say 2 years.

      Reply
    • Question? So I was told by many stylists that beeswax or any wax is not good for your hair. Over time it can build up in your hair & make it unhealthy. Now I know stylists make their money by selling the products the salon promotes, but I’m friends with them & they know I’m not buying the products. I’d cut my own hair If I could.lol. I’m wondering since the process of cold process that it won’t have the beeswax left over to actually build up in your hair. Is it just used to make a harder bar? Ty ?

      Reply
      • Hi Jess, Your stylist could be referring to hair products that contain a high percentage of wax, in this recipe the wax is minimal, diluted to less than 10%. To be honest the average hair stylist might not know how cold process works and is taught to sell you the commercial products. Ask yourself this question, what is healthier, a commercial concoction that contains who knows what seeping into your skin, or a natural product containing nourishing ingredients and oils that we are aware of? If it helps I can say that I’ve used this soap many times and there’s no residue after using it.

        Reply
  3. Do I have to include the creamed coconut, coconut oils tend to make me break out ( a lot of people don’t know coconut oil is actually comedogenic), and does it have to include lye?

    Reply
    • Hello,

      Thank you for posting this recipe and the instructions. Could you recommend a vegan alternative to the bees wax? I don’t use any animal products but I would love to try your shampoo bar.

      Greetings, Saskia

      Reply
      • Hi Saskia,

        Yes, I have a lot of vegan friends who are always looking for a good alternative to beeswax, so you’re definitely not alone in this. As for waxes, the best vegan alternative would definitely be candelilla wax. It’s actually really good wax and is very nourishing for the skin. I even use it fairly often and I’m not even vegan!

        Hope this helps!

        Reply
  4. Have you tried this recipe with the hot method? I have limited space for curing my soaps, so don’t use the cold method. Just wondering how it works up. Thanks!

    Reply
    • I would be worried about the natural sugars in the creamed coconut burning in the hot process method… That being said, I haven’t tried it yet! 😛

      Reply
  5. We can’t use almond oil due to nut allergies. Can you recommend an oil to use in place of it? We can use coconut so would that be OK? Thank you!

    Reply

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